Do Child Care Providers in Ontario need to have First Aid Training?

First Aid and CPR Training for home daycare providers The Child Care and Early Years Act, 2014 (CCEYA) and relevant regulations require staff in Licensed Centers in Ontario, and providers working under the supervision of a Licensed Agency, to have Standard First Aid/CPR training. Some erroneously believe that everyone who does childcare in their home must also legally have this training, but that is not the case. Bill 10 received Royal Assent and was passed as law by the Ontario Provincial Government on December 4th, 2014. The majority of the rules took effect on August 31, 2015 (with some exceptions which become effective on January 1, 2016 or August 31, 2017). The Act and the new regulations that govern those who provide care for children in Ontario are quite lengthy and challenging to understand. I will quote from the regulations, and subsequently from the Act itself, and try to make sense of them as they pertain to First Aid and CPR. Although I will show pertinent sections of the rules, I encourage you to read the regulations for yourself. Regulation 34 states that a first-aid kit and manual must be on site and readily available in Licensed Childcare Centers and homes that provide care through an Agency that holds a license with the Ontario government.

First-aid

34. Every licensee shall ensure that there is a first-aid kit and first-aid manual that is readily available for first-aid treatment in each child care centre it operates and in each premises where it oversees the provision of home child care.


Regulation 58 requires all staff who work in a Licensed Childcare Center to have current Standard First Aid training including Infant and Child CPR. This includes staff such as cooks and custodians. This training is also required for providers who care for children through an Agency that holds a license with the government of Ontario.

Staff training and development

58. (1) Every licensee of a child care centre or home child care agency shall ensure that there are written policies and procedures with respect to staff training and development for employees in each child care centre it operates, for home child care visitors employed by the licensee and for each home child care provider at a premises at which the licensee oversees the provision of home child care.

(2) Every licensee shall ensure that every employee working at a child care centre and every provider of home child care or in-home services has a valid certification in standard first aid, including infant and child CPR, issued by a training agency recognized by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board or otherwise approved by a director.


The confusion regarding whether or not this is mandatory for everyone who babysits on a regular basis, or provides daycare for children in their home, stems from Regulation 58 (2) where it states “… every provider of home child care or in home services has a valid certification in standard first aid…” To properly understand the use of the terms “home child care” and “in home services” as used above, one must refer to the definitions given in the Act itself. (Child Care and Early Years Act, 2014)

“home child care” means child care that meets the description set out in paragraph 1 of subsection 6 (3); (“services de garde en milieu familial”)


Now, that was helpful, wasn’t it?! 😉 If your brain works anything like mine, you are now thinking, “Thanks, so what does paragraph 1 of subsection 6 (3) say?” Here’s that part of the Act…

Exceptions

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of the provision of child care in any of the following circumstances:

home child care

1. The child care provided at the premises meets the following criteria:

i. The child care is provided,

A. by one child care provider for no more than six children at any one time or, if a lesser number is prescribed in accordance with subsection (6), no more than the prescribed number of children at any one time, or

B. if the regulations so provide, by two child care providers for no more than twice the number of children that applies for the purposes of sub-subparagraph A or, if a lesser number is prescribed, no more than the prescribed number of children.

ii. There is an agreement between a home child care agency and the child care provider that provides for the agency’s oversight of the provision of care.

iii. The home child care agency has been advised of all of the children at the premises.

iv. The group of children does not include,

A. in the circumstances described in sub-subparagraph i A, more than two children who are younger than two years old,

B. in the circumstances described in sub-subparagraph i B, more than four children who are younger than two years old or, if a lesser number is prescribed, more than the prescribed number, or

C. if the director authorizes under section 27 the provision of child care for more children who are younger than two years old than the number that applies for the purposes of sub-subparagraph A or B, more than the number specified by the director.


Perhaps you got all that, or shall I translate for you? What that means is, when the government uses the term “home child care” in the Act or Regulations, they are referring to a provider who is subcontracted to provide childcare in their home, by an agency that holds a license with the Ontario Government. Section (3) 1. ii is the key, as it defines “home child care” as being provided at a premises where “There is an agreement between a home child care agency and the childcare provider that provides for the agency’s oversight of the provision of care.” Many refer to this as licensed home daycare. Part II 6 (3) 2. is the next section of the Act which gives the guidelines for unlicensed child care, or what many would refer to as “care given by an Independent Childcare Provider” (ICP).  There is nothing in the Act or the regulations that require ICPs to have First Aid or CPR training.

unlicensed child care, five children or less

2. The child care provided at the premises meets the following criteria:

i. The child care is provided for no more than five children at any one time or, if a lesser number is prescribed by the regulations, no more than the prescribed number of children at any one time.

ii. There is no agreement between a home child care agency and the child care provider that provides for the agency’s oversight of the provision of care.

iii. The group of children does not include more than two children who are younger than two years old.


The following section is Part II 6 (3) 3 and refers to in-home services. Providers who offer this type of care also must have Standard First Aid and CPR Training. Again, this care is being provided under the oversight of an agency that holds a license with the provincial government, but in this case is in the home of the child or another place where residential care is given for the child.

in-home services

3. The child care provided at the premises meets the following criteria:

i. The child care is provided for a child at his or her home, or at another place where residential care is provided for the child.

ii. There is an agreement between a home child care agency and the child care provider that provides for the agency’s oversight of the provision of care.

iii. The home child care agency has been advised of all of the children at the premises.

iv. Financial assistance is provided under this Act for the child care.

v. The child care meets any other criteria prescribed by the regulations.


The Act itself states one of the purposes of the Act is to enhance the safety of children.

Purposes of Act

1. (1) The purposes of this Act are to foster the learning, development, health and well-being of children and to enhance their safety.


However, the new regulations stopped short of requiring ICPs to have any First Aid or CPR training. In conclusion, while it is not required, I highly recommend that all parents and providers take at least Emergency First Aid Course with CPR Level B or C. I also encourage parents who are looking for childcare to ask what training they have taken and ask to see documentation. While much of the material presented at these courses may be “common sense”, unfortunately common sense is not as common as it should be. Also, many of the skills must be learned. One would have no way to know how to properly do chest compressions or back blows if they did not take a course. I believe that this is one time when it is important to not just meet the legal requirements, but to exceed them. Do you agree with the rules the Ontario Government has put in place regarding First Aid CPR training for all staff in licensed programs (2 day Standard First Aid Course) and Independent Childcare Providers (none)? If you're a parent, how important is it to you for your provider to have this training? Do you have up to date First Aid training?facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

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